Wednesday, September 19, 2012

It's In Their Eyes

I spoke to two classes at the high school today. Along with the students four parents attended.

I really cannot find the words to describe what it is like to stand in front of these young people and parents and talk about what we have been through. I've given this talk for I really don't know how many times. There are parts for me that are very painful. It's like taking the scab off a wound that really needs the air and light. The process is healing for me but it is not without giving up a part of me too.

However much it hurts at times it is all worth it when I look at those young people listening to me. It tough when I recount how long it took me to learn what has to be done and how to be a father with a son addicted to drugs. Not sure but I might even scare some of the kids when I launch into my old worn out phrase that is used before I understood about addiction. "No lying, no stealing, no drugs, JUST WHAT THE HELL IS SO HARD ABOUT THAT!!!!" Of course I deliver that phrase at about one quarter the volume and zero percent of the anger I used when it was screamed at Alex.

The kids seem to be listening. Guess it is my training on recognizing Alex's condition. I look at their eyes. No pinpoint pupils. LOL. They are wide open. If you have seen the videos you know I can't stand still during these presentations. They follow me with their eyes. I think they hear me because I see it in their faces but mostly in their eyes.

One of the parents that attended today critiqued me at my asking. She said, "I pride myself on being a people watcher and I have never seen kids this age so focused. You touched some people today. I admit, at times I was fighting to hold back tears."

Hate to admit but there are times the speaker fights hard to hold back the tears too. This is so personal.

Two more classes tomorrow. I'll be ready, hope they are ready for me.

9 comments:

Lauren said...

What a wonderful thing you are doing! Keep up the great work :)

Bristolvol said...

Oh Ron, I can just about imagine how hard this is for you. I can harldy talk about my girl to anyone without tearing up. I don't think that this will never change. You are commended for doing this. If you reach only one child, it will have been so worth it! Thank you. You are saving lives and families.

Anonymous said...

God bless Ron! His presentations today made a difference in the lives of the students' he visited with, and the parents who attended. Mr. Grover is making a difference with everyone who meets him...whether they are employees, friends, relatives, or colleagues. We don't know the reason his family was given this challenge as I don't know why my life as been presented with traumatic challenges. I might guess part of it is reaching others. Mr. Grover reaches others.
Susan

lauren said...

Good Job, Ron. It takes alot of strength and conviction to do what you are doing. I know you are saving lives. I sent you an email tonight, I hope you are able to read it. Thank you.


beachteacher said...

Ron...God bless you. I love that you're doing this. YOU are making a difference. And that's surely SO needed. Thank you on behalf of all those kids who are vulnerable, & from all of us POAs who you're also speaking for.

Tori said...

Ron I admire you so much. There are times I just think about what B has done and it is hard to hold back the tears. I could never bring myself to stand in front of kids or Parents and tell them our story. Maybe one day and I know that you help so many by doing it. It really is a selfless thing to do.

Annette said...

Ron it is very generous and giving of you to lay your life, your pain, your journey out there for all to see. I know that you must be making a profound difference in those lives that you touch every time you put yourself out there. Thank you so much.

Terri said...

If even a couple of these young people make better choices because you shared your story...bless you!

Alex Lavrenov said...

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